Winter garden round-up

Fuchsia-pink_Winter_blooming_Rhododendron
A splash of much-appreciated Winter colour, early Rhododendron. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

So far this year, Mother Nature has provided 4 seasons in 1 month. There have been several mild days; a few blue-sky, frosty days; a couple of snow-laden days, and in between, grey skies, rain and gusty winds. The poor bulbs and bushes don’t know whether they are on the way up or whether they should still be hibernating.

Snow-scene_Perthshire_back_garden_in_late_January_2020
Earlier this week. Image: Kathryn Hawkins
Old_bare_apple_tree_covered_in_snow
Snow-covered apple tree. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The snow has now gone, and the temperature has gone up several degrees. I’m happy to say that plants and bulbs that were covered at the beginning of the week, have survived and are blooming again.¬† The crocus were a couple of weeks early this year, so they must have had one hell of a shock on Monday night when the weather changed. The rhubarb shoots have begun to unfurl since the snow melted. I think I will pop a large pot over this clump at the weekend, and force a few stems for spring.

Yellow_crocus_covered_in_snow_in_late_January
Yellow crocus, snow-covered and snow-survivors. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
First_shoots_of_new_season_rhubarb_growth
New rhubarb shoots. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

At the beginning of the week, all the snowdrops in the garden were still tightly closed, but as the thaw took hold and the temperature rose again, many of the buds have opened. These are such pretty, dainty little flowers, and are a sure sign that spring isn’t too far away. Have a good few days whatever the weather brings with it ūüôā

Flowering_in_late_January_delicate_snowdrops
New season snowdrops. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

 

Shades of Autumn

Golden_leaves_of_Japanese_maple_in_Autumn_under_a_blue_sky
Japanese maple in the Autumn sunshine. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

To be completely honest with you all, this really isn’t my favourite time of year. However,¬†when it’s not raining and when the sun is out, I¬†do spend a lot of time¬†in the garden¬†admiring the glorious colours¬†that this¬†month often has to offer.

The Japanese maple tree above is situated in the corner of my drive-way. It has leaves that seem to glow in the sunshine, and when the leaves mature and fall to the ground, they turn a vivid shade of red as they dry out.

Red_leaves_of_Japanese_maple_tree_on_ground
Fallen maple leaves. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

There is more red to be seen elsewhere in the garden. The Cotoneaster is crammed full of berries this year. Standing in front of this hardy specimen is a more delicate Fuschia bush with pink and purple petals that clash spectacularly with the scarlet berries behind.

Autumn_colours_of_Fuschia_and_Cotoneaster
Pink Fuschia and berry-laden Cotoneaster. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Another crop of Autumn crocus has sprung up in one of the flowerbeds. A later variety, these beauties are Crocus Sativus or the saffron-crocus. When the sun hits the golden stamens, the spicy aroma is quite mouth-watering.

Autumn_saffron_crocus_sativus
Crocus Sativus. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

It’s been a good year for Hydrangeas; they have been in bloom for many weeks. I love the way that the blooms fade gradually and gracefully as the days draw in, and¬†develop a¬†“vintage” appearance.

Fading_blooms_of_blue_and_pink_Hydrangea_bushes
Fading glory. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

A few plants are now on their second blooming of the year. This solitary Leucanthemum flower stem is the only one that has developed on the plant second time around. It does look a bit lonely. The variety is Bananas and Cream which is a great name for any plant in my opinion.

Have a good few days and enjoy the Autumn colours if you’re out and about ūüôā

Single_Leucanthemum_bloom
Bananas and Cream for one. Image: Kathryn Hawkins