Griddle cakes (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Griddle_or_Welsh_cakes_served_with_butter_and_raspberry_jam
Fresh out of the pan, a teatime treat. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Every now and then I have a hankering for scones, but I have yet to bake a gluten-free version that makes the grade. However, this week’s recipe is very similar in terms of ingredients to scones, but instead of the traditional oven baking, these “cakes” are cooked in a frying pan. So good are they that they have now become my gluten-free scone-alternative of choice and can be whipped up and cooked in next to no time.

A_stack_of_5_freshly_baked_griddle_cakes
Griddle cakes, a great alternative to gluten-free scones. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

For a few years, my family used to holiday in Wales, where I can remember enjoying  traditional Welsh cakes known as Cage Bach for the first time. Studded with currants, flavoured with the merest hint of spice, and served warm with butter, these were a very welcome and delicious teatime treat. Welsh cakes are traditionally cooked on a griddlestone, a heavy flat pan which sits directly on top of an open flame or stove top. They cook to a dense, but crumbly texture and are extremely moreish.

My recipe this week for griddle cakes  is an homage to my Welsh ancestry and yet another happy childhood foodie memory.

Up_close_on_Griddle_or_Welsh_cakes_on_a_wire_rack
My homage to the Welsh cake. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes: 7-8

Ingredients

  • 175g gluten-free plain flour blend + extra for dusting (If you are not gluten-free, use traditional wheat plain flour for a more authentic texture)
  • 10g gluten-free baking powder
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 70g white vegetable fat or coconut oil + extra for greasing
  • 70g caster sugar
  • 70g currants
  • 60-70g plain unsweetened dairy-free yogurt
  1. Sift the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt into a bowl. Rub in the fat until well blended. Stir in the sugar and currants.
  2. Add sufficient yogurt to make a softish dough. Turn on to a lightly floured surface and knead gently until smooth and well blended.
  3. Either press or roll the dough to a thickness of 1cm. Using a 7cm round cookie cutter, cut out 7 rounds, re-pressing or rolling the dough trimmings as necessary. I like to cook the rounds at 1cm thickness so that the cakes have a dense texture in the middle. If you roll out the dough to ½-¾ cm depth, you should make 8 cakes, and the resulting cakes will be crisper all the way through.
  4. Very lightly grease a flat griddle pan or large frying pan with a little fat and heat until melted. Place the cakes in the pan, reduce the heat to low and cook the cakes for 8-10 minutes on each side, taking care not to burn the outside – lift up the edge of 1 or 2 to check, and lower the heat further as necessary.
  5. Transfer to a wire rack to cool a little. Best served warm, spread with dairy-free butter and your favourite jam. Yummy 🙂
    6_steps_to_preparing_and_cooking_griddle_or_Welsh_cakes
    Preparing and cooking griddle cakes. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

    The cakes are best eaten on the day of cooking but they freeze well and defrost in next to no time. You can reheat them successfully by popping them in a low oven for a few minutes to heat through.

    Single_serving_of_griddle_or_Welsh_cake_with_butter_and_jam
    Griddle cake with butter and jam. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Advertisements

Rhubarb and orange streusel cake (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Drizzle_iced_spring-time_rhubarb_and_orange_streusel_cake
Rhubarb and orange streusel cake. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

It’s time for a rhubarb recipe this week on my blog. Spring is well under way now and rhubarb is plentiful. In the garden at the moment, my own early rhubarb plant is coming along nicely and looks very healthy. Not quite ready for picking just yet, but I don’t think it will be long.

Home-grown_rhubarb_growing_in_late_March_2019
Early variety home-grown rhubarb. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

This week’s post is a dense-textured, delicious rhubarb cake that can also be served warm as a pudding. You do need a fair bit of rhubarb to make the cake – 600g. Cut the rhubarb stalks to the same thickness for even cooking during the first part of the recipe, and take care not to over-cook  in order to retain some texture in the finished bake.

A_bundle_of_fresh_spring_rhubarb_stalks
Spring rhubarb stalks. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The orange adds a subtle flavour to the cake, but leave it out if you prefer. Bake the rhubarb with a little water instead of the juice. For a spicy twist, replace the orange rind in the cake mix with ground ginger and/or mixed spice.

hubarb_and_orange_streusel_cake_with_slice_out
Rhubarb streusel cake with a hint of orange. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Serves: 8-10

Ingredients

  • 600g fresh rhubarb stalks
  • 1 medium orange
  • 3 tbsp. caster sugar

For the streusel mix:

  • 85g gluten-free self raising flour
  • 75g jumbo oats
  • 50g cornflour
  • 50g dairy-free margarine, softened

For the cake:

  • 200g dairy-free margarine, softened
  • 200g caster sugar
  • Finely grated rind 1 orange
  • 200g plain dairy-free yogurt (I used plain soya yogurt)
  • 100g ground almonds
  • 100g gluten-free self raising flour

To decorate (optional):

  • 100g icing sugar
  • Fresh orange zest
  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C, 180°C fan oven, gas 6.  Trim the rhubarb and cut into even  thickness pieces, 3-4cm long. Place in a roasting tray. Pare the rind from the orange using a vegetable peeler, and extract the juice. Stir both into the rhubarb and sprinkle over the sugar. Bake for about 15 minutes until just tender, then leave to cool in the tin.

    Prepared_rhubarb_with_orange_rind_and_juice_sprinkled_with_sugar
    Roasting rhubarb. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  2. Reduce the oven temperature to 180°C, 160°C fan oven, gas 4. Grease and line a 23cm cake tin. For the streusel, mix the dry ingredients in a bowl and rub in the margarine. Set aside.
  3. For the cake mix, put all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk everything together until well blended.
  4. Drain the rhubarb well, reserving the cooking juices, and pat dry with kitchen paper. Put half the cake mix in the tin, spread smoothly, sprinkle over half the streusel mix and top with half the rhubarb.
  5. Spoon over the remaining cake mix and spread smoothly. Sprinkle over half the remaining streusel mix and arrange the remaining rhubarb on top.
  6. Finally, sprinkle the rhubarb with the remaining streusel, stand the cake tin on a baking tray and bake for about 1 ¾ hours, covering with foil after an hour or so to prevent over-browning. The cake is cooked when a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Leave to cool in the tin to serve cold as a cake, or stand for about 30 minutes to firm up before removing from the tin to serve warm as a pudding with dairy-free custard  and the reserved juices spooned over if liked. Assembling_rhubarb_and_orange_streusel_cake

    3_final_steps_for_assembling_rhubarb_and_orange_streusel_cake
    Assembling the streusel cake ready for baking. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  7. To decorate and serve as a cake, carefully remove from the tin and place on a wire rack. Sift the icing sugar into a bowl and mix in about 4 tsp of the reserved cooking juices to make a soft, dripping icing. Drizzle over the top of the cake using a teaspoon and scatter with orange zest. Leave for about 30 minutes to firm up before slicing to serve.
    3_steps_showing_the_finished_cake_and_how_to_decorate_it
    Decorating the streusel cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins.
    Overhead_image_of_iced_and_decorated_rhubarb_and_orange_streusel_cake
    Streusel cake, ready to serve. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

    I keep the cake in the fridge and bring to room temperature for a few minutes before serving. You can also heat up a slice in the microwave for a few seconds to take the chill off. The cake freezes well without the icing. Have a good week 🙂

     

 

Gluten-free bread-making (dairy-free; vegan)

Small_seeded_gluten-free_vegan_loaf_of_bread
Seeded gluten-free loaf. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I’ve been trying to make a decent gluten-free loaf for some time. Whilst I still haven’t mastered the light and airy consistency of the ready-made loaves I sometimes buy, I am very pleased with the chewy texture and flavour of this loaf recipe. I combined starchy tapioca and rice flours with jumbo oats and a little xanthan gum which all go together to create a dense loaf with a springy bite that tastes good untoasted. The texture (not the flavour) reminds me of the dense German pumpernickel-style breads.

2_bags_gluten-free_flour,_a_tub_of_xanthan_gum,_and_jumbo_oats
Gluten-free rice and tapioca flours; xanthan gum, and jumbo oats. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
Slice_of_gluten-free_bread_spreadwith_dairy_free_margarine_and_raspberry_jam
Bread and jam. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I made 2 variations of the same recipe, one with small seeds added – flax, black sesame and chia – and the other I kept plain and added a few more oats to the mixture to increase the fibre content. The method and ingredients are the same for both loaves.

Sliced_seeded_gluten-free_loaf_and_plain_white_loaf
Small seeded and plain white gluten-free loaves. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Because there is no gluten to develop, bread-making the gluten-free way is a doddle. No kneading, just a quick mix and then you can get on with your life for a couple of hours or so, until the yeast has done the rest of the work for you. Here’s the recipe 🙂

Makes: 1 small loaf

Ingredients

  • 125g tapioca flour
  • 125g white rice flour
  • 50g jumbo oats (for plain white loaf, use 65g)
  • 75g mixed small seeds, optional
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 12g light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1 tsp easy blend dried yeast
  • 1 tbsp. sunflower oil
  • 275ml tepid water
  • 5ml unsweetened soya milk + ½ tsp maple syrup, to glaze
  • 15g crushed sunflower and pumpkin seeds or extra oats, to sprinkle
  1. Lightly grease a 500g loaf tin. Mix the flours, oats, seeds (if using), salt and sugar in a bowl. Add the yeast and stir in completely.
  2. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and stir in the oil and water to make a thick batter.

    Dry_gluten-free_bread-making_ingredients_and_mixed_with_oil_and_water
    Mixing up the bread batter. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  3. Transfer the mixture to the greased loaf tin, smooth the top and place in a large, clean food bag. Secure the bag closed making sure there is enough room for the bag to expand. Leave to rise in a coolish room temperature, out of draughts, for about 2 ½ hours until slightly risen and a few bubbles appear on the top.

    Proving_gluten-free_bread_mix_and_ready_for_baking
    Proving gluten-free bread mix. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  4. Preheat the oven to 200°C, 180°C fan oven, gas 6. Brush the top of the loaf lightly with the soya and maple glaze and sprinkle with seeds or oats. Bake for 40-45 minutes until golden and crusty – the loaf should sound hollow when tapped on the base. Remove from the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack.

    Out_of_the_oven_seeded_gluten-free_loaf
    Freshly baked gluten-free seeded loaf. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The loaf will keep lightly wrapped or in a tin, at room temperature for  about a week, or you can slice it and freeze it for longer storage. I have toasted the bread; it becomes denser and for some reason doesn’t brown all over, but it still tastes good. Have a good week 🙂

Gluten-free_white_loaf_back-to-back_with_a_seeded_gluten-free_loaf
2 gluten-free loaves, one recipe. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Salame al cioccolato (Chocolate salami) (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Chocolate_salami
Chocolate and orange treat. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I thought it was time to deliver a little treat. This week, I’ve broken into the chocolate to make something deliciously decadent. Still feeling inspired by my culinary adventure with Sicilian red oranges in last week’s post, I used some to flavour this rich Italian confection which is traditionally served at the end of a meal with coffee and liqueurs, or in my case, Marsala wine.

Slices_of_chocolate_salami
Sliced Italian chocolate salami with coffee and Marsala wine. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I was watching a travel programme about Sicily over the festive holidays. It really does seem like a food and drink paradise, and I hope to pay a visit some day. In the meantime, I tracked down some of the island’s Modica chocolate which is so very different from any other chocolate I have eaten or cooked with. It is naturally vegan as it is made with just cocoa, sugar and vanilla. The texture is grainy and slightly crunchy, with a flavour that is rich and intense. Modica chocolate is very like the chocolate the Aztecs would have been familiar with; it was introduced to Europe in the 16th century by the Spanish, and I’m delighted to have finally made its acquaintance.

Bar_of_Sicilian_Modica_chocolate
Sicilian Modica chocolate. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

You can add any flavourings you fancy to the basic salami recipe. I opted for all things Italian and went with pistachios, marzipan and the red orange. Candied peel is often added but I’m not a huge fan. Because I had the fresh red oranges to hand, I made my own non-candied peel which is much softer and much more zesty than the preserved variety. However, feel free to use the more traditional candied peel if you like it.

I put some red orange juice in the salami mixture as well. If you fancy something with more oomph, you can use 2 tbsp.  liqueur instead. I used a dairy-free margarine which has a lower fat content than a solid fat. The combination of the margarine and the added liquid gives a more fudgy texture to the salami. If you prefer a firmer set then leave out the liquid altogether and use something like coconut oil  (or unsalted butter if you eat it) which will give a much firmer set.

Red_orange_juice_and_rind_chopped_marzipan_and_shelled_pistachios
Italian flavours. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes 16 slices

Ingredients

  • 2 medium oranges, red or other variety
  • 100g 50% cocoa Modica or similar free-from plain chocolate
  • 75g dairy-free margarine
  • 150g free-from ginger biscuits, lightly crushed (or use your favourite variety)
  • 50g natural pistachio nuts, roughly chopped
  • 75g natural marzipan, finely chopped
  • 15g each ground almonds and icing sugar
  1. First prepare the orange rind. Using a vegetable peeler, pare off the orange rind thinly. You need about 40g rind to achieve a rich orange flavour.
  2. Slice the pared rind into thin strips. Bring a small saucepan of water to the boil and cook the strips for 4-5 minutes until soft. Drain and cool under cold running water, then drain well and pat dry, before chopping finely. Extract 2 tbsp. juice from one of the oranges – and enjoy the rest of the juice at your leisure 🙂

    Steps_to_making_fresh_orange_peel
    Making fresh orange peel. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  3. Break up the chocolate and place in a heatproof bowl. Add the dairy-free margarine and place the bowl over a saucepan of barely simmering water, and leave until melted. Remove from the water and allow to cool for 10 minutes.
  4. Put the biscuits, pistachios, marzipan, chopped orange rind and juice in a bowl and mix together, then stir in the melted chocolate. Leave in a cool place for about 30 minutes to firm up but not set completely.

    Mixing_up_the_chocolate_salami
    Chocolate salami mix. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Line the work top with a large double layer of cling film and pile the chocolate mixture in the centre to form a rough rectangular shape about 24cm long.
  6. Fold over the cling film and twist the ends closed to make a fat sausage-like shape with slightly tapering ends. Chill for at least 2 hours, preferably overnight until firm.

    Steps_t0_shaping_chocolate_salami
    Shaping chocolate salami. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  7. To decorate, place a large sheet of baking parchment on the work top and sift the ground almonds and icing sugar down the centre to cover an area the same length as the salami.
  8. Carefully unwrap the salami and roll evenly in the sweet almond mixture to coat it lightly. Slice and serve. Store any remaining chocolate salami in the fridge – the sugary almond coating will start to dissolve in the fridge but this doesn’t affect the flavour or texture of the salami. Buon appetite!

    Close_up_of_chocolate_salami
    Delizioso. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

For Burns Night, Scottish shortbread (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Aluminium_tin_with_Scottish_shortbread_rounds
Scottish shortbread. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Happy Burns Night, or Day, depending on when you are reading this!

When I started my blog several months ago, my very first recipe was for an old favourite of mine, shortbread. Looking back recently, I thought that the recipe could do with a bit of an update. Now I have a dairy-free version which I am very happy with and so, I have updated my original recipe, timing it for this year’s January 25th celebration.

For a couple of weeks now, I’ve noticed that my Scottish recipe posts have been receiving quite a few views, so here are links to other recipes you might like to try this January 25th: tattie scones, chocolate haggis, vegan haggis and Burns Night mini chocolate haggis.

Aluminium_thistle_embossed_cake_tin
Vintage thistle cake tin. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

On with the recipe. I have given my shortbread rounds a suitably Scottish flourish by embossing them with a thistle on the top. If you don’t have a traditional shortbread mould, then simply roll out the dough and cut out rounds using a plain or fluted edge cookie cutter. Prick the tops and press the edges with the fork before baking.

Thistle_embossed_shortbread_rounds_with_whisky_tumblers
Shortbread and whisky, Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Here’s the link back to the updated original shortbread recipe – now dairy-free and vegan as well as gluten-free – and if you are using a shortbread mould, there are some step by steps images to help you.

That’s all for this week. I’m off for a wee dram; I’ll be posting again soon. Sláinte!

Whisky_and_shortbread_for_Burns_Night_2019
Sláinte! Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Mince pie crumbles (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Cake_stand_piled_high_with_mince_pie_crumbles
Mince pie crumbles. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I love a good mince pie, and this recipe is one of easiest and tastiest you can make. No rolling pin or tart tins required, just a square cake tin and a pair of (clean) hands.

You can use homemade or readymade mincemeat for the filling and any combination of dried fruit or nuts you have – it’s a good way to use up leftover bits and pieces. Grated apple also works well added to the mincemeat. Add a splash of your favourite tipple and you have something very festive indeed!

Dried_apricots_cranberries_and_vegan_mincemeat_with_cherry_brandy
Mincemeat and fruit filling with a splash of cherry brandy. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The crumbles keep well for up to a week when stored in an airtight container – they will become softer and more cake-like a time goes by, but the flavour intensifies – and they also freeze well. Enjoy them warm, straight out of the tin, as a hot pudding, or let them cool and serve as a delicious bake. Here’s what to do:

Makes: 16

Ingredients

  • 115g solid white vegetable fat (such as Trex or coconut oil), softened
  • 115g dairy-free margarine or spread
  • 115g soft light brown sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp good quality almond extract, optional (or use 1 tsp ground cinnamon or mixed spice to flavour)
  • 100g ground almonds
  • 250g gluten-free plain flour blend (such as Doves Farm)
  • 10g gluten-free baking powder (such as Dr Oetker)
  • 500g vegan mincemeat
  • 100g dried cranberries
  • 100g chopped dried apricots
  • 2 tbsp. cherry brandy or your favourite tipple
  • 50g golden marzipan (optional)
  • 1 tsp icing sugar, to dust
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C, 160°C fan oven, gas 4. Grease and line a deep 21cm square cake tin. In a mixing bowl, beat together the fat. margarine, sugar and salt until well blended. Stir in the ground almonds and extract or spice, if using.
  2. Sift the flour and baking powder on top and mix everything together to form a soft, crumbly mixture. Press 350g of the mix into the base of the tin – I find using a floured back of spoon is a good way to achieve a smooth, thick base. Prick all over with a fork and bake for 20 minutes until lightly golden and firm.
  3. Mix the mincemeat, cranberries, apricots and brandy together and spread over the base. Sprinkle the remaining crumble on top, gently packing it down but making sure you retain the crumbly texture.
  4. Bake for about 40 minutes until lightly golden and firm to the touch. Leave to cool for 10 minutes, then slice into 16 squares. Leave in the tin to cool completely before removing and arranging the pieces on a board or tray.

    How_to_make_mince_pie_crumbles
    Making mince pie crumbles. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. To decorate, roll out the marzipan thinly and cut out as many stars or festive shapes as you are able, re-rolling the marzipan as necessary. Arrange the stars on the squares and dust lightly with icing sugar.
    Serving_of_a_single_square_of_mince_pie_crumbles
    Ready for the eating. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

     

    This is my last post for 2018. I’d like to thank all of you who have stopped by my blog and read my posts. It is a pleasure to write my posts and receive such lovely feedback.

    It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas as the song says, we had our first snowfall last night and I woke to the garden transformed into Narnia. On this wintry note, I’d like to wish you all a very happy Christmas and new year when it comes. I will be back up and running in a few weeks.

    A_snow_covered_Perthshire_garden_in_mid_December
    Festive snowfall. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Mini gluten-free Arlette (dairy-free; vegan)

Small_2_tier_cake_stand_of_mini_gluten-free_arlette_biscuits
Mini gluten-free Arlette biscuits. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

A few months ago, I posted a recipe on how to make a gluten-free rough puff pastry; it has proved to be one of the most looked at recipes on my blog. If you have the time, it is worth making your own pastry, but now there are also viable ready-made pastries to use if you are in a hurry such as Jus-rol gluten-free puff pastry sheets.

This week’s recipe is based on a French patisserie classic. Arlette are traditionally large, thin spirals of very crisp puff pastry flavoured with butter, cinnamon and sugar. My free-from version is flavoured with vanilla seeds but feel free to use a dusting of ground cinnamon if you prefer something more authentic. I found it easier to make smaller rounds as it is challenging to roll out, and then slice, gluten-free pastry thinly. If you’re not gluten-free, just roll out regular puff pastry as thinly as possible and prepare and cook the Arlette in the same way.

Close-up_of_a_single_mini_gluten-free_arlette_biscuit
Sugar and spice, and all things nice. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

It’s a simple recipe with few ingredients, but the pastries taste very good, and make the perfect nibble to go alongside a mid-morning coffee 🙂

Coffee_shot_with_mini_gluten-free_arlette
Mid-morning coffee break. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes: 28

Ingredients:

  • 1 vanilla pod
  • Gluten-free flour for dusting
  • 275g gluten-free, vegan puff or rough-puff pastry
  • 25g vegan margarine, softened
  • 25g caster sugar
  1. Line 2 baking trays with baking parchment. Slice the vanilla pod in half and using the tip of a small, sharp knife, scrape out the seeds from the middle. Put to one side.
  2. Lightly dust the work surface with flour and roll out the pastry to make a 30cm square.
  3. Spread the vanilla seeds all over the pastry, then spread with margarine and sprinkle with sugar.
  4. Carefully roll up from one side, as tightly as possible, to make a long, thin sausage-shape.

    Step_by_step_to_making_gluten-free_arlette
    Arlette preparation. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Trim away the ends to neaten, then cut into 1cm thick slices – you may find it easier to flour the knife blade each time you make a cut. You should be able to make 28 thin rounds. Transfer them to the baking trays and chill for 30 minutes.
  6. When you are ready to cook the Arlette, preheat the oven to 200°C, 180°C fan oven, gas 6. Bake for 20-25 minutes until crisp and golden. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

    Gluten-free_arlette_preparation_rolling_to_baking
    Rolling, slicing and baking Arlette. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  7. Serve them underside up to reveal the crisp sugar coating and vanilla seeds. If you can leave them alone, they will store for up to a week in an airtight container.

    Top_tier_of_small_cake_stand_displaying_mini_gluten-free_arlette
    Ready to serve, home-made gluten-free Arlette. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

 

Upside-down plum and marzipan cake (dairy-free; vegan, with gluten-free variation)

Vegan_upside-down_plum_and_marzipan_cake
Upside-down plum and marzipan cake. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The garden’s taken a bit of a battering this week. It’s been very windy since the weekend and yesterday the remnants of the recent US Hurricane blew through. Fortunately, there doesn’t seem to have been too much damage, but any plums that I left on the tree are no longer.

Victoria_plum_tree_and_a_wooden_crate_of_picked_plums
This year’s Victoria plum harvest. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

I had been picking the Victoria plums  since the beginning of last week, and thankfully harvested the majority of what was left at the weekend. I’ve been busy making jam, and freezing a few in bags for later use. The tree is only small, but it has done very well this year in spite of the dry summer, although some of the plums are smaller than usual.

Close-up_of_fresh_Victoria_plums
Freshly picked ripe Victoria plums. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Stoned fruit like plums, apricots and peaches go very well with the flavour of almond. If you crack the stones open, the inner part of the kernel has a strong almond aroma – I always add the kernels, in a muslin bag, to jam as it cooks, to give it more flavour. I realise marzipan isn’t to everyone’s taste, but is one of my favourite ingredients and in my mind, is perfect for eating with plums. This week’s recipe will work fine without it, the cake will be lighter in texture and will cook slightly quicker.

Overhead_image_of upside-down_plum_and_marzipan_cake
Perfect flavour paring of plums and almonds. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

You can make this cake with most fruit, just be aware that if a fruit is very juicy, the bottom of the cake will be quite sticky and may not completely cook through. The cake also makes a great pudding served warm with custard. I use spelt flour, the white variety, for this cake, but use gluten-free plain if you’re intolerant to wheat, and ordinary plain white flour if you don’t have spelt.

Serves: 10

Ingredients

  • 300g golden caster sugar
  • 550g plums
  • 175g dairy-free margarine
  • 175g non-dairy yogurt (coconut or soya work well)
  • 175ml unsweetened non-dairy milk (I used soya)
  • 190g white spelt flour (or gluten-free plain flour)
  • 12g gluten-free baking powder
  • 175g ground almonds
  • 175g marzipan, cut into small pieces
  • 20g flaked almonds, toasted
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C, 160°C fan oven, gas 4. Grease and line a deep, 23cm round cake tin. Sprinkle the base of the tin with 2 tbsp. sugar and put to one side.
  2. Halve the plums and remove the stones, then arrange in the bottom of the tin to cover it completely. If you have any plums left over, chop them and sprinkle them over the layer of plums.
  3. Put the margarine in a bowl with the remaining sugar and whisk together for 3-4 minutes until creamy and light in texture and colour. Gently whisk in the yogurt and dairy-free milk with half the flour until well blended. Sieve the remaining flour and baking powder on top; add the ground almonds and marzipan, and mix everything together until thoroughly blended.

    Step_by_step_images_for_making_upside_down_cake
    Preparing upside-down cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  4. Spoon the cake mixture on top of the plums and smooth over the top. Put the tin on a baking tray and bake for about 1 ½ hours until richly golden and firm to the touch. Leave to cool for at least 30 minutes in the tin before serving warm, or leave to cool completely in the tin if serving as a cake.
  5. To serve, turn the cake out on to a serving plate and sprinkle with flaked almonds to serve.

    Upside_down_plum_and_marzipan_cake_sliced
    Sliced and ready to serve, plum and marzipan cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Golden flax and polenta cake (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Iced_flax_seed_and_polenta_cake_with_blueberries
Golden flax and polenta cake. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I fancied a spot of baking this week especially as it seemed to be a while since I baked a cake for my blog. This recipe is extremely easy to make, even if you’re an inexperienced baker, there is little to go wrong here. The cake is naturally dense in texture so you haven’t got to worry about whisking for a specific length of time or getting a good rise. The decoration is optional, the cake tastes just as good with or without icing. The mixture is not particularly sweet and makes a good alternative dessert topped with fruit, accompanied with free-from cream or ice-cream.

Easy_to_make_flax_and_polenta_cake
Easy to make cake. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The cake gets its rich yellow colour from polenta and cold pressed rapeseed oil. I’m very fortunate to have an excellent local supply of this amber coloured oil called Summer Harvest. The rapeseed is harvested just down the road from my house. The oil has an earthy, nutty flavour and makes an excellent addition to any recipe with nuts and seeds added to it. If you prefer to use an alternative oil, us sunflower oil which adds little extra flavour but the cake will also be paler in colour.

Yellow_sack_of_polenta_grain_and_bottle_of_cold_presse_rapeseed_oil
Polenta and locally produced cold pressed rapeseed oil. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

I usually use just ground almonds and polenta in this recipe, but for a change,  I ground up flax seed with whole almonds to make a fine meal. As long as you grind the seeds or nuts finely, you should be able to use any combination with polenta in this recipe. I use an electric coffee grinder to make my own seed and nut flours, I find the sturdier blade is able to blitz more finely than the food processor or blender.

Electric_coffee_grinder_for_grinding_flax_seeds_and_whole_almonds
Flax seeds and whole almonds ground to make a flour. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Serves: 8

Ingredients

  • 150ml cold pressed rapeseed oil
  • 1 tsp good quality natural vanilla extract
  • 150g unbleached caster sugar
  • 100g silken tofu
  • 50g each flax seeds and whole almonds, finely ground
  • 125g polenta
  • 5g gluten-free baking powder (such as Dr Oetker)
  • 10g arrowroot

To decorate:

  • 100g ready to roll white icing
  • ½ tsp good quality natural vanilla extract
  • A handful of fresh berries
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan oven, gas 4). Grease and line an 18cm a round cake tin. Pour the oil into a bowl. Add the vanilla and sugar and whisk together until creamy and well blended. Add the tofu and whisk again until smooth.
  2. Add the seed mix, polenta, baking powder and arrowroot, and gently mix all the ingredients together until well blended. Scrape into the tin. Stand the tin on a baking tray and bake for an hour – test the centre of the cake with a wooden skewer, it should come out clean when the cake is properly cooked through. Leave to cool completely in the tin.

    Step_by_step_preparation_to_cake_making_and_baking
    Making and baking the cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  3. To decorate the cake, remove the cake from the tin and place on a wire rack. Cut up the white icing into pieces and put in a small saucepan. Add 1 tsp water and heat the mixture very gently, stirring, until it begins to melt and form a paste. Stir in the vanilla, then drizzle the icing all over the top of the cake using a dessert spoon, letting it drip down the sides. As the icing cools, it will set firm again.

    Melting_ready-to-roll_white_icing_to_decorate_a_cake
    Icing the cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  4. Leave the icing to cool and scatter, then scatter the top with berries before serving. I used my latest precious harvest of blueberries. Not a very good year for them in my garden, but the berries do have a good flavour none the less. Have a good week 🙂
    On_the_bush_and_harvested_late_August_Scottish_blueberries
    Home-grown blueberries. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

    A_slice_and_a_forkful_of_flax_and_polenta_cake
    Rich in texture and colour, flax and polenta cake. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Rhubarb and almond jalousie (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Sliced_rhubarb_and_almond_slatted_pastry
Iced and sliced, rhubarb and almond jalousie. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I pulled my first stems of rhubarb at the weekend. The 3 crowns I re-planted back in the Autumn are doing well in their new patch (watched over by 2 stone rabbits), and it is looking likely that there will be plenty more stems before the summer is over.

Rhubarb+patch_and_trug_of_freshly_picked_stems
My first harvest of home-grown rhubarb. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

To celebrate my first harvest, I have a simple rhubarb recipe to share this week. It’s a pastry classic, and gets its name from a slatted louvre window because it has thin slits cut across its top which give a glimpse of the filling inside. I’ve combined the tartness of the fresh rhubarb with the sweet, richness of marzipan, but I realise this is an ingredient not to everyone’s taste, so if you’re not a marzipan fan, simply leave it out altogether or make a thick vanilla custard instead and spread this across the pastry instead.

Iced_whole_jalousie_and_and_single_portion
Iced and ready to serve. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

I gave a recipe for a Gluten-free rough puff pastry (with dairy-free & vegan variation) on my blog last year which you can use for this recipe, but if you don’t have time to make your own, SillyYak make a very good gluten-free, vegan-friendly pastry. Alternatively, for wheat eaters, roll out ready-made traditional puff pastry thinly and instead.

Serve this delicious pastry warm as a dessert with custard or leave to go cold and enjoy a slice as a pastry with a cup of coffee.

Serves: 6

Ingredients

  • 300g fresh rhubarb
  • 40g caster or vanilla sugar
  • 325g gluten-free, vegan puff pastry (such as Silly Yak)
  • 125g natural marzipan, coarsely grated
  • A little dairy-free milk, optional
  • 50g icing sugar
  • A few drops almond extract
  • A few toasted flaked almonds
  1. Trim the rhubarb and cut into short, even-thickness lengths. Place in a frying pan, sprinkle over the sugar and heat gently until steaming. Cover and cook gently for about 5 minutes until tender. Leave to cool completely. Cooking rhubarb this way means you will have little juice which is important in this recipe in order to keep the pastry crisp.
  2. When ready to cook, preheat the oven to 220°C (200°C fan oven, gas 7). Line a large flat baking tray with baking parchment. Divide the pastry into 2 equal portions. On a lightly floured surface, roll out one piece of pastry to make a rectangle 28 x 15cm.
  3. Sprinkle over the marzipan, leaving about 2cm pastry showing all round the edge, and spread the rhubarb on top. Brush the pastry edge with water or little dairy-free milk if preferred.

    3_stages_to_assembling_a_jalousie
    Preparing the bottom layer of the jalousie. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  4. Roll the other piece of pastry to a rectangle slightly larger than the bottom piece and carefully lay the pastry on top. Press down the edges well to seal them together and slice off any ragged pastry to neaten the edge.
  5. Using a sharp knife, cut thin slashes through the top of the pastry to make the slatted effect. Carefully transfer the pastry to the baking tray, brush with dairy-free milk if liked and bake for about 30 minutes until browned. Leave on the tray to cool for 30 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool further.

    3_further_stages_to_making_and_baking_a_jalousie
    Finishing and baking the jalousie. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  6. To decorate, sieve the icing sugar into a small bowl and mix in a few drops of almond extract and about 2 teasp warm water to make a smooth, drizzling icing. Use a teaspoon to drip the icing all over the top of the warm or cold pastry and then scatter with almonds. Transfer to a serving plate or board to slice and serve.
    Jalousie_freshly_drizzled_with_almond_icing
    Freshly drizzle-iced jalousie, sprinkled with toasted flaked almonds. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

    Slice_of_rubarb_and_almond_jalousie_ready_to_eat
    An iced slice, ready to eat. Image: Kathryn Hawkins