Cherry almond amarettis (Gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan)

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Vegan cherry almond amaretti cookies. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

For several weeks, every now and again, I have been trying to make eggless meringues. The meringues I prefer are the large, pillow-like ones made with brown sugar and lots of chopped nuts and a drizzle of dark chocolate, and not the plain white, dainty variety. Sadly, I haven’t been successful so far. However, my experimentation has led me to find other uses for vegan “egg white”, hence, I come to this week’s post.

Next time you open a can of cooked white beans or chickpeas in water, keep the canning liquid, for this is vegan “egg white”. Amazing as it sounds, the liquid whips up into a thick foam and can be used (with care) as a substitute for fresh egg whites. You may find it referred to as aqua fava for after all, that is what it is: bean water!

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Bowls of butter bean and chickpea canning water. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The drained liquid content of a 400g can is approx. 140ml which equates to 3 medium egg whites. It freezes well so you don’t need to use all of it in one recipe – an ice cube tray is perfect for individual egg-sized amounts, but don’t forget to label it otherwise your G&T may taste a little strange! As with fresh egg white, place in a clean, grease-free bowl and whisk in the same way. I add a pinch of cream of tartar to assist the volume when whisking up.

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Whipped butter bean and chickpea canning water. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Once I have cracked a decent meringue recipe and got my sugar and nut quantities correct, I look forward to sharing it with you. Until then, here is my recipe for Italian amaretti cookies. These are the soft variety, and are truly delicious (and very moreish). They make a lovely gift too.

Makes: 18

  • A few sheets of gluten-free edible paper (optional)
  • 45ml chickpea or white bean canning water
  • Pinch of cream of tartar
  • 225g ground almonds
  • 100g glacé cherries, chopped
  • 125g + 2 tsp icing sugar
  • 2 tsp natural almond extract
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan oven, gas mark 4). Line 2 large baking trays with baking parchment. Using a 4cm diameter round cookie cutter, trace and cut out 18 rounds of edible paper if using, and place on the trays, spaced a little apart.
  2. Put the canning water in a clean, grease-free bowl and whisk until softly foaming. Add the cream of tartar and continue whisking until the beaters leave an impression in the foam – this takes about 3-4 minutes of whisking.
  3. Put the almonds and cherries in a bowl. Sift 125g icing sugar on top. Mix well and then add the almond extract and whisked foam. Carefully mix together to make a softish dough.
  4. Divide into 18 portions and form each into a ball. Place one on top of each paper circle and press down gently to flatten slightly – if you’re not using the paper, just space them out directly on the lined trays.

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    Amaretti making. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until lightly golden and firm to the touch. Cool for 5 minutes then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. The biscuits will store for up to 2 weeks in an airtight container. Serve lightly dusted with icing sugar.
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Sugar-dusted cherry amarettis. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

For gifting, wrap each amaretti cookie in a small, clean square of tissue paper, and twist the ends on each side to seal the wrapping. Arrange in a shallow box and tie with ribbon to present. Perfect for serving with coffee.

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Gift-wrapped amarettis. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

 

 

 

Chocolate, rosemary and orange muffins (gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan)

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Chocolate, rosemary and orange muffins. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

On the shortest day of the year, here’s a little something baked to brighten up the barely light hours. I picked rather too much rosemary the other day, and spent a few days pondering on how best to use it up. It doesn’t freeze very well and I’m not a fan of the dried stuff. After admiring the stems as a herbal arrangement in my kitchen for a while, I decided to do some flavour experimentation, and these muffins are the result.

I wasn’t really intending them to be so festive looking, but the sprigs reminded me of tiny pine trees and then my mind started going into creative mode. I hope you enjoy them. The flavour is really rich and perfect for the time of year. You only need to use the leaves for this recipe – the stems are too tough – and try to chop the leaves as small as possible for the best flavour and better eating.

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Fresh rosemary. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes: 10

  • 150ml sunflower oil
  • 150g dark brown sugar
  • 150g silken tofu
  • 45g cocoa powder
  • 2 level tsp gluten-free baking powder (such as Dr Oetker)
  • 1 level tbsp ground arrowroot (I often add this to help bind gluten-free cake mixtures together)
  • 100g ground almonds
  • 75g polenta
  • Finely grated rind 1 unwaxed orange
  • 2 level tsp finely chopped rosemary leaves
  • Pinch of salt
  • 125g icing sugar + extra to dust
  • Approx. 40ml freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 10 tsp Chia or poppy seeds
  • 10 small sprigs of fresh rosemary
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan oven, gas mark 4). Line a muffin tin with 10 paper cases. Put the oil, sugar and tofu in a bowl and whisk together with an electric mixer until well blended and thick.
  2. Sieve 25g cocoa, baking powder and the arrowroot on top. Add the almonds, polenta, orange rind, chopped rosemary and salt. Mix all the ingredients together until thoroughly combined.
  3. Divide the mixture equally between the cases. Smooth the tops and bake for about 35 minutes until just firm to the touch – the cakes may look slightly sunk in the middle. Cool in the tins for 5 minutes then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
  4. To decorate, sieve the icing sugar and remaining cocoa powder into a small bowl and mix together with sufficient orange juice to make and smooth, spreadable icing. Spoon sufficient icing on top of each muffin and spread to cover the top completely.
  5. Sprinkle the top of each muffin with 1 tsp seeds. Leave for a few minutes to set before adding the finishing touches.
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    Decorating the muffins. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

    Just before serving, carefully put the muffins into small flower pots. Push a sprig of rosemary into the top of each and if liked, dust the rosemary lightly with a little icing sugar for a frosted look.

    The muffins freeze well once iced and seeded, and will also keep for 4-5 days in an airtight tin once decorated. Simply decorate with fresh rosemary and icing sugar just before serving.

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    Frosty-looking chocolate, rosemary and orange muffin. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

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    Gluten-free and vegan, a deliciously dark and tasty chocolate, rosemary and orange muffin. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Festive Floretines (gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan)

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Festive Florentines. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I’m spoilt for choice at this time of year as to what sweet treats and edible goodies to make, but Florentines have to be up there in my Top 10 of all time favourites. These thin, crisp, Italian, chocolate-spread morsels are jammed packed with fruit and nuts, and they are just as delicious served with a spoonful of your favourite ice cream or sorbet, as they are with a cup of coffee.

I have chosen to use a combination of candied green fruits, seeds and nuts, but you can use any dried or candied fruit, and any unsalted, roasted nuts and seeds – in fact these biscuits are one of the best ways to use up any bits and pieces of dried fruit, nuts and seeds you have leftover. They will also work with all fruit or all nuts and seeds, so you can make up your own combinations to suit your personal preference.

Traditionally, Florentine biscuits are spread with melted dark chocolate on the back, but they are good left as they are. Cover the backs with 90% extra dark chocolate for a less sweet finish, and, if you can bring yourself to give them away, they make a lovely gift.

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Angelica, green-coloured cherries, pistachio nuts and pumpkin seeds. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes: 20

  • 75g coconut oil or vegan margarine
  • 75g golden syrup
  • 50g gluten-free plain flour blend (such as Dove’s Farm)
  • 60g pumpkin seeds
  • 60g unsalted shelled pistachio nuts, lightly crushed
  • 100g green glacé cherries, roughly chopped
  • 25g angelica, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp good quality natural almond or vanilla extract (such as Dr Oetker)
  • 200g milk free, vegan white “chocolate”
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan oven, gas mark 4). Line 2 large baking trays with baking parchment. Melt the oil or margarine with the syrup in a saucepan. Remove from the heat and stir in the remaining ingredients except the white “chocolate”.
  2. Drop 20 heaped teaspoonfuls, spaced well apart on to the prepared trays, and flatten each mound slightly. Bake for 10-12 minutes until flattened and lightly golden. Leave to cool for 10 minutes on the trays, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.Preparation_of_mixture_for_baking_Florentines
  3. To cover the biscuits with chocolate, put just over half the amount of chocolate in a heatproof bowl and melt over a saucepan of barely simmering water. Line a large board with baking parchment.
  4. Working on one biscuit at a time, carefully dip and roll the edge of the biscuit all the way round in chocolate and place on the lined board. Leave to set.

    Covering_gluten-free_Florentines_with_vegan_white_"chocolate"
    Covering the sides and backs of Florentines in melted white “chocolate”. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Once all the biscuits are dipped and set, melt the remaining chocolate as above. Turn the biscuits over and spread a little chocolate thinly over the backs. Leave to set. Note: If you can leave them alone, these biscuits will store well in an airtight container for up to 1 week.
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Vegan, gluten-free, chocolate-dipped Florentine biscuit. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Cranberries & Cranberry Jam recipe (gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan)

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Cranberry plant with fruit. Plant images: Stuart MacGregor. Berry image: Kathryn Hawkins

In my humble opinion, there is no fruit nor vegetable that looks more festive than the cranberry. The fresh berries have just started arriving on the greengrocer’s shelves these past few days. The season for fresh cranberries in the UK is quite short, so I’m stocking up my freezer for a year round supply.

The cranberry plant is low growing and creeping in habit, and likes damp, acidic soil; it is a member of the heather family. A few years ago, I grew my own plant in a deep pot. Once it was established, it made a lovely trailing plant in a hanging basket for a while, until I forgot to water it (!) and sadly, it met a very sorry, shrivelled, end. I hope to try again this spring if I can track down a suitable mature plant.

The waxy-looking, scarlet berries are rich in Vitamin C and a staple of the Thanksgiving and Christmas menu. I’ve just made a batch of jam to serve with the Christmas roast; very easy to make and much nicer than anything you can buy in a jar. Add finely grated orange rind for a zesty flavour, and/or a few spoonfuls of Port at the end of cooking for a richer taste. I put the jam into small jars which then makes it ideal for gifting.

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Jars of my freshly made cranberry jam. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Makes: 5 x 200ml jars

  • 500g fresh cranberries – the recipe will also work fine using frozen berries
  • 175ml water
  • 600g granulated sugar
  1. Put the berries and water into a preserving pan or large saucepan. Put a lid over the pan and begin heating – the berries will start “popping” and may jump a bit as they warm up.
  2. Bring the contents of the saucepan to simmering point and cook gently for about 10 minutes until the berries are soft and pulpy.
  3. Stir in the sugar over a low heat until dissolved, then boil rapidly for 5-8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thick and the liquid has reduced. Cranberries have lots of pectin so this mixture will set readily without having to test that a setting point has been achieved.
  4. Spoon whilst hot into warm sterilised jars and seal immediately. Once cool, label and cover the jar lids if preferred. Store in a dry, cool, dark cupboard; as with most preserves, cranberry jam will keep for several months.

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    Homemade cranberry jam. Image: Kathryn Hawkins