Golden garden

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Golden corner. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello again. I hope you are keeping well and that you have been enjoying some good weather. After a mostly miserable May all over the UK, the clouds finally disappeared towards the end of last month and the warmth and sunshine began in earnest. I was away from home for a few days and when I came back I was amazed at how much the garden was transformed. Every corner and flower bed was alive with golden yellow Welsh poppies.

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Welsh poppies in paths, beds and rockery. Images: Kathryn Hawkins.
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Poppy-filled borders. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The amount of poppies this year seems exceptional, and they are a welcome flash of brightness now that the bluebells are finishing. Quite a sight to behold when the sun is shining.

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Welsh poppies ablaze in the sun. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

As you can probably imagine, the poppies seed themselves and are very well suited to the climate here. One of the most successful plants in the garden in fact. They are loved by the bees and will keep producing new flower buds well into the Autumn. Something I hadn’t noticed until this year was how they close up towards the end of the day. Given that it is light until well after 10pm at this time of the year, they seem to fold in their petals a long time before the daylight begins to fade.

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Day-time and dusk. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The bright yellow petals make a great contrast with so many other plants in the borders. Also doing well this year is the aptly named Snow in Summer or Cerastium which is cascading over one of the walls at the moment, and the fresh, green Euphorbia is thriving at the very back of the garden.

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Poppies amongst the Cerastium and Euphorbia. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Just a short post from me this week, but hopefully a bright and cheery one. I wish you well for the days ahead and look forward to sharing my next recipe post with you a few days time. Until then, take care and my best wishes to you 🙂

Joyous June

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Lovely lupins. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

From the last few days of May, I think my garden looks at it’s best. There is so much colour, so many fragrant blooms, it is a real joy to be outside, and even the weeding seems less of a chore! The weather has been kind, and I have been outside more than I have been indoors. The lupins are great value in the garden; the flowers with their rich, spicy aroma, are in bloom for a long time, and once the long heads have finished, cut them off and smaller blooms appear for a second showing.

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White and pink lupins. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The last of my spring bulbs are in flower now. I planted alliums for the first time a couple of years ago, so this is their second late spring showing. I love the intricate web of tiny star-like lilac flowers that make up the globe shaped bloom.

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Allium cristophii. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

It’s been a fine year for rhododendrons and azaleas. Most have past their best now, but this scarlet beauty stands at the bottom of the drive-way and is always one of the last to flower. It makes a stunning display. The later varieties are particularly sweet-smelling. The peachy-pink one below is heavily scented although sadly not quite so many blooms this year. The pure white azalea and the apple blossom-pink rhododendron, on the other hand, are almost overloaded with blooms.

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Scarlet rhododendron. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

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Later flowering rhododendrons and a white azalea. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

One of the finest trees in the garden is the laburnum. On a bright day, the rich yellow glow from the petals is quite dazzling, and the heavy scent is intoxicating. The flowers look particularly glorious against a blue sky. Sadly it’s not in flower for more than a few days before the petals start falling like vibrant confetti, all over the garden.

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In full flower, laburnum tree. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I have been patiently waiting for this iris to come into flower. For the first time, I split the rhizome back in the Autumn and was delighted (and relieved) when the buds started to form about a month ago. This variety is a real beauty called Iris Pallida; the pale sky blue flowers have the aroma of slightly spicy bubble-gum. It’s planted in a dry, sunny corner by the front house wall, and flowers from the top down. I believe the rhizome of this particular iris is used as a botanical in some gin varieties.

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Iris pallida. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

My final image to share this month, is from a crop of plume thistles Atropupureum which are growing in the back garden. Not only popular with me, but the bees love them too 🙂

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Plume thistle (Atropupureum) and bee. Image: Kathryn Hawkins