Early December in the garden

A_Scottish_garden_in_December_under_a_blue_sky
Blue-sky December day. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

As I sat down to write this post last night, we were awaiting the arrival of the first major storm of the season. Nothing has materialised overnight, but it is suddenly feeling much colder. There is a thick frost this morning, and it is bright and clear again, the wind has dropped, and all is calm.

On the whole, the first few days of the month have been quite kind to the gardeners amongst us here in central Scotland. Whilst the east coast did have more seasonal weather, we were blessed with several blue sky days, milder temperatures, and some glorious sun rises.

To be honest, I haven’t been outside much recently – work has kept me inside. The garden is looking a bit tired now, and ready for a rest. I cleared a lot of the autumn debris a couple of weeks ago and it’s beginning to look a bit bare in places. However, the evergreens provide shape and colour and look very vibrant on a fine day, and the Cotoneaster hedge is laden with berries, as it is every year.

Cotoneaster_hedge_laden_with_red_berries
Berry-laden Cotoneaster hedge. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

The best value plants in the garden this year have been the carnations I planted last year – taken as cuttings from a birthday bouquet. They began flowering in August, and are still producing blooms at the moment. I’m sure the winter weather will get to them eventually, but the south-facing wall seems to be providing them with sufficient shelter to have kept them going this far into the year.

Orange-red_carnations_in_bloom_in_December
Carnations enjoying the winter sunshine. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Elsewhere in the garden, the colours have faded. The Hydrangeas have taken on a beautiful “vintage” look, and the blooms of Echinops and white Japanese Anemones have left behind interesting seed-heads which are slowly weathering away.

Faded_colour_of_a_blue_Hygrangea_flower
Faded beauty: Blue Hydrangea. Image: Kathryn Hawkins
Seed-heads_of_Echinops_and_Japanese_Anemones
Globe thistle and Japanese Anemone seed heads. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The last of my garden features this month is this wee fellow, a perennial primrose. Just one solitary bloom at the moment, hidden away in a sheltered, damp part of the garden. A small flash of pale yellow which acts to remind me that spring will be here again in just a few weeks. Have a good week 🙂

December_bloom_of_a_perennial_primrose
Perennial primrose. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

2 thoughts on “Early December in the garden

  1. Beautiful pictures, as always! How did you manage to get carnation plants from a bouquet? Did you keep them in water until roots started growing? You are very gifted, Kathryn!
    The wind has left the British Isles and started hitting France. We were on the road yesterday and we could definitely feel it. It also brought some of the much needed rain with it, and snow flurries at higher altitudes. Winter is here!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your kind words. Yes, I rooted cuttings in water. I do have the pictures to post at some point. It is very easy, but I think spring is the best time to get the cuttings to take in soil. We have had a few very light flurries of snow this morning but the sky is still bright blue and the sun is out. Glad you have had some rain at last. Take care 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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