Autumn shades in a Perthshire garden

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Autumn shades in a Perthshire garden. Image by Kathryn Hawkins

This time last month, I was wondering what I would be sharing with you in November. But having had an unseasonally mild October, with no high winds or frosts, we are being treated to a magnificent Autumn, here in central Scotland. As I type this, I am looking out on to the copper beech in the front garden which is a blazing coppery-orange in the setting sun.

All around this part of the country, trees form the backdrop of the scenery. Autumn is a time for getting out of doors and celebrating the glories of natural colour. I’m fortunate in the fact that I don’t have to travel very far to experience this, my garden is alive with different shades of foliage, and even a few flowers.

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Japanese Maple. Image by Kathryn Hawkins
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Japanese Maple foliage. Image by Kathryn Hawkins
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Red blueberry bush leaves. Image by Kathryn Hawkins

Back in the Summer, I shared my white Hydrangea flowers in a post. The plant is still producing, and now as a bonus, the foliage is starting to turn wonderful shades of blue and purple; I thought it was worth another outing.

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White Hydrangea with peacock-blue leaves. Image by Kathryn Hawkins

I’ll draw this piece to a close (the light is rapidly fading outside) with a splash of colour from one of my favourite garden plants, the nasturtium. This variety is called Empress of India and the leaves are a blue-green when they first open, and the flowers a deep red. It’s been blossoming for a few weeks now and has gone a bit “blousy”, but still offers an eye-catching display at the front of the house. I wonder what I’ll be posting next month; fingers crossed the garden’s not covered in a pile of the white stuff……

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Nasturtium: Empress of India. Image by Kathryn Hawkins

My garden in September

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Globe thistles in early September sunlight. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

So another month has passed, and now we are heading towards a season change. We have had some wild winds and heavy rains, on and off, this last month, but everything is just about standing. The Echinops (Globe thistles) are looking magnificent just now.

Much of my garden is in shades of blue and pink, but the greenery is still lush and the trees are barely turning. One obvious sign of Autumn are the mauve crocus that appear without any leaves (the foliage comes afterwards). They are quite delicate and aren’t in flower for very long. They thrive in shady areas and are quite easy to miss, usually hiding under shrubbery. These, however, are blooming, bold as brass, on the corner of one of the borders.

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Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale) in full bloom. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

Throughout the year, different heathers come into flower, but from late Summer going into Autumn, I think the heathers are at their finest. I have many varieties growing around the garden, ranging in shade from bright white and the palest pink, to deep pink and red.

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Autumn flowering heathers in my Perthshire garden. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

One last plant that I am particularly proud of is my Himalayan Hydrangea. I planted it about 10 years ago and it is now very well established; this year is has flowered particularly well. I love the flowers of this variety (Lacecap); the larger petals look like pink butterflies perching on top of tiny mauve flower heads.

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Himalayan Hydrangea (Hygrangea macrophylla lacecap). Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

August flowerings

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Scottish garden flower bed in early August. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

I’d been thinking that this is the month that my garden begins to lose some of its overall colour. But I have been pleasantly surprised when I put this post together. I have chosen a different flower bed to photograph this month – the Ox-eye daisies are in full bloom and you can see the Lysimachia, Hydrangeas and Scabious in the background, which add vibrancy now the pretty shades of late spring have faded.

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Pink Hydrangea. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins
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Pink Scabious and Lysimachia. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

All round the garden, from mid July onwards, I have bold and brash coloured poppies opening out, adding splashes of pinks and reds in the beds. And then, by way of contrast, white and pale pink Japanese Anemones grow in wispy clumps; they look so fragile and delicate and yet they always bounce back after a heavy shower.

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Large red, black-centred poppies. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins
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Pale pink Japanese Anemones

I have many lavender plants, but sadly most are fading fast now as the season progresses. My favourite is the deepest blue-purple Dutch Lavender which grows next to a rather messy clump of Santolina (or cotton lavender). The contrast between the 2 colours is mesmerising on a sunny day. The lavender is coming to the end of a very long flowering, but it’s still adding a lovely splash of colour in the borders and some late pollen for the bees.

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Cotton lavender (Santolina) and Dutch lavender in full bloom. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

There are now some more obvious signs in the garden that Autumn is not too far away. Apart from the slight nip in the air, there are floral reminders too. The globe thistles (Echinops) are blueing up, and several borders are glowing with the colours of Montbretia and Golden Rod. But I’m still clinging on to a memory of summer with a second blooming of lupins.

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From top left: Lysimachia and Montbretia; From bottom left: Echinops and Golden Rod. Second Lupin blooms. All images: Kathryn Hawkins

I’m going to close this post with an image of my beautiful white Hydrangea which is just opening up. I don’t have many white flowers in the garden, but this is a beauty. When the flower heads are fully open, the tiny centres of each turn pale blue. I have always thought that these flowers would make a stunning bridal bouquet.

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White hydrangea and petal. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins