Autumn vibes

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Blue sky and autumn leaves. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello again. It’s been a lovely weekend so far here in central Scotland. Lots of sunshine and blue sky which really shows off these Japanese maple leaves, slowly on the turn from green to gold, and finally to red before they fall. The temperature has dropped a few degrees, and the forecast is for a much cooler week ahead, so I think the new season has well and truly arrived.

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Scottish autumn-flowering heather. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The garden is still looking quite flowery which is good news for the bees. It’s been a great year for all the heathers, with the autumn varieties looking particularly pretty and laden with tiny blooms.

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Fading white Hydrangea.. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The well-established white Hydrangea shrub has been heavy with flowers this year. A victim of its own success, its thin stems and branches have bowed with the weight of all the flower-heads. Whilst most have a pinkish or brown tinge, there are still one or two perfectly white blooms visible with their pin-head-sized tiny blue centres.

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Late flowering Campanulas. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The Campanulas have been out in flower for a while. I keep trimming away the spent flower-heads and new ones have been forming lower down the stems which is why they are still flowering so late in the year. The same goes for the deep-pink Verbascum which is now flowering for the third time this year.

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Deep pink Verbascum. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

When I was out in the garden today, I was happy to see so many bees and flying insects enjoying the flowers and sunshine as much as I was. All the lavender bushes in the garden have a few late sprigs of flowers which these insects particularly love.

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Autumn lavender flowers. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

It’s not all blue, purple and pink in the garden, the Rose of Sharon has produced a few more golden yellow flowers which have a waxy-look to the petals in the sunshine.

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Second flowers on Rose of Sharon (Hypericum). Images: Kathryn Hawkins

My final image is of my favourite Lupin which has broken my back garden record this year, with its third flowering of the year. It’s not fully open yet but it’s not far off. All the other Lupin bushes have died down completely yet this one has stayed lush and healthy. Alongside is one of my Borage flowers; these have only just decided to put in an appearance this week. Better late than never though 🙂

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Third flowering Lupin and the first Borage flowers of the season. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

I hope you have enjoyed my images this week. I will be back in the kitchen for my next post. Until then, take care and thanks, as always, for stopping by.

My garden in September

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Globe thistles in early September sunlight. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

So another month has passed, and now we are heading towards a season change. We have had some wild winds and heavy rains, on and off, this last month, but everything is just about standing. The Echinops (Globe thistles) are looking magnificent just now.

Much of my garden is in shades of blue and pink, but the greenery is still lush and the trees are barely turning. One obvious sign of Autumn are the mauve crocus that appear without any leaves (the foliage comes afterwards). They are quite delicate and aren’t in flower for very long. They thrive in shady areas and are quite easy to miss, usually hiding under shrubbery. These, however, are blooming, bold as brass, on the corner of one of the borders.

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Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale) in full bloom. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

Throughout the year, different heathers come into flower, but from late Summer going into Autumn, I think the heathers are at their finest. I have many varieties growing around the garden, ranging in shade from bright white and the palest pink, to deep pink and red.

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Autumn flowering heathers in my Perthshire garden. Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins

One last plant that I am particularly proud of is my Himalayan Hydrangea. I planted it about 10 years ago and it is now very well established; this year is has flowered particularly well. I love the flowers of this variety (Lacecap); the larger petals look like pink butterflies perching on top of tiny mauve flower heads.

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Himalayan Hydrangea (Hygrangea macrophylla lacecap). Image copyright: Kathryn Hawkins