Spiced spinach tattie scones (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

Dish_of_spinach_tattie_scones_with_serving_suggestion_of_mango_chutney
Lightly spiced spinach and potato scones served with mango chutney. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you this week. With tighter restrictions entering many of our lives for the foreseeable future, I have turned to another comforting recipe this week. I am revisiting a Scottish classic, and also the most popular recipe on my blog to date, the humble tattie (or potato) scone.

Overhead_ image_of_rustic_dish_filled_iwth_spinach_tattie_scones
Freshly cooked and ready to serve. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

You can read my original recipe here but this time I have given the basic ingredients a spicy twist, inspired by one of my favourite Indian dishes, Saag aloo.

Colander_of_spinach_leaves_with_freshly_dug_home-grown_potatoes
Classic combination, spinach and potatoes. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I have grown a lot of potatoes this year. At the beginning of lockdown back in March, I struggled to find any seed potatoes to buy, and ended up with a variety called Nicola which has turned out to be a very tasty and very high-yielding potato. I planted mostly in pots and the old barrel below. I am storing the leftover crop in dry soil in the greenhouse for winter use.

Home-grown_Nicola_potatoes
Freshly dug Nicola potatoes. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The recipe is very simple, with just a few ingredients. I have a couple of tips for guaranteed success: use a dry-textured potato for good results and also drain and dry off the cooked spinach as much as possible to avoid soggy scones. When you cook the scones, only brush the pan with oil so that you give them a little colour without making them crispy.

I use a garam masala spice blend for a mild, fragrant spiciness, but try using your favourite curry powder if you prefer something more defined.

Makes: 8

Ingredients

  • 425g potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • Salt
  • 5 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed
  • 4 tsp garam masala
  • 300g baby spinach
  • 60g gluten-free plain flour blend
  • 1 tsp gluten-free baking powder

1. Put the potatoes in a saucepan with a pinch of salt. Cover with water, bring to the boil and cook for 7-10 minutes until completely tender. Drain well; leave to air dry, then push through a ricer to make smooth. Leave to cool.

Cooking_and_ricing_potatoes
Boiled potatoes put through a ricer. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

2. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a small frying pan and gently fry the onion, garlic and spices for 2-3 minutes. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat and leave to cook gently in its own steam for about 15 minutes until very soft. Leave to cool.

Cooking_onion_with_spices
Cooking down the onion and spices. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

3. Rinse the spinach and pack into a saucepan whilst wet. Heat until steaming, then cover with a lid, reduce the heat, and cook for about 5 minutes until wilted. Drain well, pressing against the sides of the colander or strainer to remove as much excess water as possible. Leave to cool.

Cooking_spinach_for_spinach_and_potato_scones
Preparing the spinach. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

4. Once the spinach is cold, chop it up and then blot well with kitchen paper to remove any excess water that remains in the mix.

5. To make the dough, put the potatoes, onion and spinach in a bowl. Add the flour, baking powder and some salt. Mix together to form a ball, and roll out on a lightly floured work top to a thickness of about 1cm. Use an 8-9cm round cutter to make 8 scones, re-rolling the dough as necessary. Cover and chill until required.

Making_and_shaping_spinach_and_potato_scone_dough
Making the scone dough. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

6. When you are ready to cook, brush a frying pan lightly with oil, heat until hot then cook the scones gently for about 3 minutes on each side until lightly golden. Drain and keep warm. If you want to store them, cool them on a wire rack, then cover and chill. They will keep for about 5 days in the fridge and also freeze well.

Cooking_spinach_and_potato_scones
Cooking spiced spinach tattie scones. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

To reheat, either give them a quick blast in the microwave for a few seconds, or gently toast on a dry frying pan for a a couple of minutes on each side.

They make a delicious accompaniment to a bowl of soup just as they are, or spread with butter or margarine and topped with mango chutney 🙂

Overhead_image_of_a_buttered_spinach_tattie_scone
Buttered-up and ready to eat. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

That’s all from me this week. Until next time, take care and keep safe.

8 thoughts on “Spiced spinach tattie scones (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

  1. I have made your recipe using cold mashed potatoes (dairy-free, leftovers from a previous meal), spinach of course, and gluten-free oat flour. Very easy, and quite good. Another time I will make sure I include shallots which I didn’t have. Thank you again!

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  2. I have bought Nicola potatoes on occasion and liked them. I am glad you were lucky to find good seed potato during the first lockdown. I hope I won’t have to resort to the supermarket kind again next year, I know I am repeating myself, but they are the most tasteless potatoes we have had since we started growing our own.
    I am curious about growing potatoes in pots. How large do they need to be? Any particular tips you want to share?
    Thank you for sharing this recipe, Kathryn. I hope you are well. Let’s cook and forget about the C word!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Joëlle. Interesting that you’d heard of Nicola potatoes. I thought it was a new variety as I’d never seen them before. Pot-grown potatoes are very successful, but they are quite thirsty and it can be difficult to judge when they need watering. As a general rule, 30cm wide minimum width and depth, and plant 2 or 3 sprouting tubers in each. You can grow a single potato in a slightly smaller pot for one yield at a time. Perhaps I’ll do a post on it next year 🙂 Back in 2010, I wrote a book called Pot It, Grow it, Eat it which was all about growing fruit and veg in containers. You may still be able to track down a copy. All the best (no mention of the C word from me!). Kathryn 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The two of us thank you very much for the detailed explanations. Depending on where we are next spring, we may resort to your method. I didn’t know you had written a book, Kathryn! I will see if I can get myself a copy.

        Liked by 1 person

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