Spiced spinach tattie scones (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

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Lightly spiced spinach and potato scones served with mango chutney. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you this week. With tighter restrictions entering many of our lives for the foreseeable future, I have turned to another comforting recipe this week. I am revisiting a Scottish classic, and also the most popular recipe on my blog to date, the humble tattie (or potato) scone.

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Freshly cooked and ready to serve. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

You can read my original recipe here but this time I have given the basic ingredients a spicy twist, inspired by one of my favourite Indian dishes, Saag aloo.

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Classic combination, spinach and potatoes. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I have grown a lot of potatoes this year. At the beginning of lockdown back in March, I struggled to find any seed potatoes to buy, and ended up with a variety called Nicola which has turned out to be a very tasty and very high-yielding potato. I planted mostly in pots and the old barrel below. I am storing the leftover crop in dry soil in the greenhouse for winter use.

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Freshly dug Nicola potatoes. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The recipe is very simple, with just a few ingredients. I have a couple of tips for guaranteed success: use a dry-textured potato for good results and also drain and dry off the cooked spinach as much as possible to avoid soggy scones. When you cook the scones, only brush the pan with oil so that you give them a little colour without making them crispy.

I use a garam masala spice blend for a mild, fragrant spiciness, but try using your favourite curry powder if you prefer something more defined.

Makes: 8

Ingredients

  • 425g potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • Salt
  • 5 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed
  • 4 tsp garam masala
  • 300g baby spinach
  • 60g gluten-free plain flour blend
  • 1 tsp gluten-free baking powder

1. Put the potatoes in a saucepan with a pinch of salt. Cover with water, bring to the boil and cook for 7-10 minutes until completely tender. Drain well; leave to air dry, then push through a ricer to make smooth. Leave to cool.

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Boiled potatoes put through a ricer. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

2. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a small frying pan and gently fry the onion, garlic and spices for 2-3 minutes. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat and leave to cook gently in its own steam for about 15 minutes until very soft. Leave to cool.

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Cooking down the onion and spices. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

3. Rinse the spinach and pack into a saucepan whilst wet. Heat until steaming, then cover with a lid, reduce the heat, and cook for about 5 minutes until wilted. Drain well, pressing against the sides of the colander or strainer to remove as much excess water as possible. Leave to cool.

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Preparing the spinach. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

4. Once the spinach is cold, chop it up and then blot well with kitchen paper to remove any excess water that remains in the mix.

5. To make the dough, put the potatoes, onion and spinach in a bowl. Add the flour, baking powder and some salt. Mix together to form a ball, and roll out on a lightly floured work top to a thickness of about 1cm. Use an 8-9cm round cutter to make 8 scones, re-rolling the dough as necessary. Cover and chill until required.

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Making the scone dough. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

6. When you are ready to cook, brush a frying pan lightly with oil, heat until hot then cook the scones gently for about 3 minutes on each side until lightly golden. Drain and keep warm. If you want to store them, cool them on a wire rack, then cover and chill. They will keep for about 5 days in the fridge and also freeze well.

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Cooking spiced spinach tattie scones. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

To reheat, either give them a quick blast in the microwave for a few seconds, or gently toast on a dry frying pan for a a couple of minutes on each side.

They make a delicious accompaniment to a bowl of soup just as they are, or spread with butter or margarine and topped with mango chutney ūüôā

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Buttered-up and ready to eat. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

That’s all from me this week. Until next time, take care and keep safe.

Rise and shine oatmeal porridge (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

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A super sunny start to the day. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello everyone! I have something bright and cheerful for you this week. Given all the doom and gloom in the news, this tasty and super-charged breakfast will get your day off to a bright and cheerful start. It’s a seasonal update on a recipe I posted a couple of years ago.

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Blood orange slices. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

No sooner has the bitter marmalade orange season finished, the next citrus beauties are on the horizon, coming into the shops and markets in mid-February. Actually, the season is coming to an end but I’ve been enjoying the ruby-red fleshed oranges for a couple of weeks already. This orange seems to have had a name change, and is now, rather boringly, called red orange, but I will always think of them as the blood orange or Sanguinelli. The flavour is sweet and tart at the same time. They are very juicy and you never quite know how red the flesh will be until you start peeling.

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Perfect peeling. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

For the past few days the weather has been decidedly chilly here; it’s been the kind of temperature that calls for porridge. My recipe for an overnight oatmeal porridge which cooks in the slow-cooker means it is ready for you to enjoy the next morning without any fuss. The oatmeal is cooked the traditional Scottish way in just water with some salt to season. Everything else is added afterwards. I posted the original recipe back in March 2018 – you can find it here.

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Slow-cooker + water + salt + oatmeal. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

To make 6 hearty servings, put 150g pinhead oatmeal in your slow-cooker. Add a generous pinch of salt and pour over 950ml cold water. Cover with the lid and switch on to the low setting. Leave for 8 hours (up to 10). After the cooking time, the surface of the porridge will form a light skin, but give it a good stir and the creaminess of the cooked oats will be appear. Once I’ve got my portion in my cereal bowl, I mix in oat milk (I love the Barista versions for extra richness) to loosen up the texture. Once the porridge has cooled it will solidify. It will keep in the fridge for up to a week, and reheats very well in the microwave – just mash with a fork, mix in some milk and reheat.

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Slow-cooker oatmeal porridge. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

So with the cooking taken care of, you just need to make up your mind what to eat with it. To prepare the orange slices, slice the top and bottom off an orange and then remove the peel by slicing downwards with a sharp knife, trying to take only the skin and white pith away. Slice into rounds or chop smaller.

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Homemade marmalade for extra citrus flavour. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Back in January, I posted my recipe for Seville orange marmalade. I’ve been putting my stocks to good use this week. It makes a great addition to a bowl of porridge, adding some sweetness and also more orange-flavour. All in all, this is a seriously citrusy and sunshiny breakfast bowl, with a few pecans sprinkled over for some crunch. I’m looking forward to my breakfast already ūüôā Until next time, I hope you have a good few days and stay healthy.

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A breakfast bowl of sunshine, Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Burns Night 2020

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Happy Burns Night! Image: Kathryn Hawkins

January 25th is a national celebration here in Scotland. The day commemorates the birthday of the famous Scottish poet, Robert (Rabbie) Burns. All over the country, parties and gatherings will be held in honour of Mr Burns, based around a traditional meal of haggis, neeps (mashed turnip or swede) and tatties (mashed potato), washed down with a wee dram or two of whisky.

I have noticed from the stats on my site, that from the end of December onwards, my tattie scones recipe gets lots of hits from all over the world. I think, in fact, that this is the most popular recipe I have ever posted. The chocolate haggis is a close second. Vegan_haggis_and_tattie_scones_traditional_Scottish_Burns_night_food

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Vegan haggis, tattie scones, shortbread and chocolate haggis. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The recipes for my vegan haggis and my old favourite, shortbread , as well as the aforementioned, can be found by clicking on the (pink) links.

Whatever you’re doing this January 25th, I hope you have a good time. I raise a glass to you and say “Sl√†inte”.

PS. A recipe for the (naked) gingerbread men will follow shortly ūüôā

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A wee highland gingerbread man decorated for Burns Night. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

For Burns Night, Scottish shortbread (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

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Scottish shortbread. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Happy Burns Night, or Day, depending on when you are reading this!

When I started my blog several months ago, my very first recipe was for an old favourite of mine, shortbread. Looking back recently, I thought¬†that the recipe¬†could do with a bit of an update. Now I have a dairy-free version which I am very happy with and so, I have updated my original recipe, timing it for¬†this year’s¬†January 25th celebration.

For a couple of weeks now, I’ve noticed that my Scottish recipe posts have been receiving quite a few views, so here are links to other recipes you might like to try this January 25th: tattie scones, chocolate haggis, vegan haggis and Burns Night mini chocolate haggis.

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Vintage thistle cake tin. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

On with the recipe. I have given my shortbread rounds a suitably Scottish flourish by embossing them with¬†a thistle on the top. If you don’t have a traditional shortbread mould, then simply roll out the dough and cut out¬†rounds using a plain or fluted edge cookie cutter.¬†Prick the tops and press the edges with the fork¬†before baking.

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Shortbread and whisky, Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Here’s the link back to the¬†updated original¬†shortbread recipe – now dairy-free and vegan as well as gluten-free – and if you are using a shortbread mould, there are some¬†step by steps images¬†to help you.

That’s all for this week. I’m off for a wee dram; I’ll be posting again soon. Sl√°inte!

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Sl√°inte! Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Vegan haggis (dairy-free; gluten-free variation)

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Haggis, neeps and tatties the vegan way. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Hello again. I hope 2019 is going well for you so far. There’s¬†a wee bit of forward planning gone into ¬†this week’s recipe. Next Friday, January 25th, is the Scottish feast of Burns Night, which is traditionally celebrated in a very meaty way with the dish of haggis accompanied with the only vegetarian part of the meal:¬†“neeps and tatties” (mashed turnip (swede) and¬†potatoes). I’ve been working on a meat-free version for a while, and finally I think I’ve cracked it this year. The flavour and texture is not that far off the traditional version and much nicer than any commercially made veggie haggis I have tried. I hope I¬†might tempt you into making one for yourself.

You’ll need to allow at least a day in advance before you cook the haggis,¬†but it will keep wrapped up¬†in the fridge for 3 or¬†4 days before cooking if you want to prepare ahead.

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Burns supper. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Without going into the grim details of what’s in a traditional haggis, I’ve replaced the meat, etc.¬†with mushrooms, red lentils and pearl barley¬†which give the texture¬†in the dish. Other than that, the bulk of the¬†haggis is made¬†up¬†in the¬†traditional way with toasted oatmeal. For a completely gluten-free version, replace the pearl barley with well-cooked white or brown rice, and use certified free-from¬†oatmeal. I’ve¬†stuck to¬†the traditional haggis seasonings of plenty of black pepper, nutmeg and salt.

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Traditional haggis seasoning: salt, pepper and nutmeg. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Because there is no outer “skin” to contain¬† the¬†vegan haggis mixture, the¬†assembly method¬†is quite long, however the recipe¬†itself is pretty straightforward. I’ve included¬†plenty of step-by-step images¬†to help with the assembly. Let me know how you get on ūüôā

Serves: 3-4

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 225g large flat mushrooms. peeled and chopped
  • 100g pinhead oatmeal or groats (use certified gluten-free if Coeliac)
  • 150g cooked, well-drained¬†red lentils
  • 150g cooked, well-drained pearl barley (use well-cooked brown or white rice¬†to make¬†completely gluten-free)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¬Ĺ tsp ground black pepper + extra to serve
  • A large pinch grated nutmeg
  • Approx. 4 tbsp.¬†cold vegetable stock
  • 50g vegetable suet
  1. Heat the oil in a lidded frying pan and gently fry the onion with the bay leaf, stirring, for 2 minutes. Cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and cook for 15 minutes until soft. Add the mushrooms, raise the heat and stir fry for 2 minutes. Cover again,  reduce the heat and cook gently for 10 minutes until tender. Leave to cool completely. Discard the bay leaf.

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    Cooking mushrooms for vegan haggis. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  2. Meanwhile, heat a dry frying pan until hot. Sprinkle over the oatmeal, and cook, stirring the oatmeal over a medium heat, for 7-8 minutes, to “toast”, without over-browning. Leave to cool.

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    Cooking oatmeal. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  3. To assemble the haggis, mix the oatmeal, lentils and barley or rice into the cold mushroom mixture. Add the seasoning, and sufficient stock to bind the mixture together without making it too wet – how much you need will depend on how juicy the mushrooms are – then¬†mix in the suet –¬†it is important that¬†everything is cold otherwise the suet will melt.

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    Mixing the haggis ingredients. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  4. Lay 3 large  sheets of cling film, approx. 44 x 32cm, on top of each other on a tray or work surface. Pile the haggis mixture in the centre. Fold the longest sides of cling film tightly over the mixture and then twist the ends tightly closed to form a chunky haggis shape, approx. 16cm long. Put in the fridge to firm up overnight.

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    Shaping the haggis. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. To cook the haggis, Lay a sheet of foil on¬†a tray or¬†work surface (same size as the cling film) and then place a sheet of baking parchment on top. Carefully unwrap the haggis and¬†carefully place it¬†in the centre of the parchment. It should its hold shape but won’t be completely solid. Fold the parchment over the haggis as¬†you did with the cling film; scrunch the ends gently together and¬†fold the parchment underneath the haggis. Wrap the foil¬†over and twist the ends tightly¬†to retain the haggis shape.

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    Preparing vegan haggis for cooking. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  6. Pour a 1cm depth of water into the bottom of a deep, lidded frying pan or a large saucepan. Bring to the boil, then place¬†the haggis in the water, seam-side up; cover with the lid, reduce to a gentle simmer and cook for 1 ¬ľ hours until piping hot – if you have a food probe, test the centre, it should be at least 75¬įC to serve.

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    Cooking the haggis. Images: Kathryn Hawkins
  7. Carefully drain the haggis and leave to stand for 10 minutes. Remove the foil and place the haggis, still in the parchment, on a warmed serving platter. Open out the parchment and serve straight away, accompanied with mashed turnip and potatoes, and more black pepper if liked.

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    Freshly cooked vegan Haggis. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Note: if you have any haggis leftover, let it cool and chill it down for the next day. Cut into chunky slices and fry for a few minutes on each side until crisp, brown and hot. Serve with tomatoes and oatcakes. This is my favourite way of serving and eating haggis, the oatmeal becomes crunchy and deliciously nutty when fried. Have a good week!

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Vegan haggis, even better the next day. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

Overnight seed and berry porridge (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

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Oatmeal and seed porridge with berry compote. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

It still feels more¬†wintry than spring-like¬†here in central Scotland. We have had a blue-sky day today, the first for a while, and the temperature is slowly rising. The snow is beginning to thaw slowly, but most of the garden is still covered in a thick, white crust of powdery snow. The snowdrops under the hedge¬†are the first to¬†emerge at long last and I am relieved¬†to see that they have survived their week inside a snow-cave¬†– what robust little flowers they are ūüôā

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After-the-snow snowdrops. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

One of my favourite warming breakfast dishes is porridge, and it seems a lot of people agree: porridge has become the super-star amongst breakfast cereals, and the supermarket shelves are stacked out with different varieties and all sorts of flavours.

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Pinhead oatmeal for “proper” porridge”. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I like¬†my porridge made the traditional way,¬†which means¬†I¬†prefer to use¬†oatmeal (or groats)¬†rather than¬†rolled oats. However, it’s not an instant breakfast and requires some organisation: the oatmeal requires overnight soaking¬†before it can be cooked. But if you have a slow-cooker, you can cut down on the preparation: just mix everything up in the slow-cooker the night before¬†and leave it on¬†a low setting until the next morning, by which time it’s ready to eat as soon as you want it.

The oatmeal in the picture above¬†is a local Scottish brand and is not guaranteed gluten-free. As you will know, oats themselves don’t contain gluten, but there is a contamination risk from other grains during processing, so if you do have a serious gluten allergy, you¬†should seek out gluten-free oatmeal.

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Slow-cooker porridge: oatmeal, water and salt. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

If you don’t fancy leaving your slow-cooker on overnight, slow-cook the porridge¬†as you like, and once cooked and cooled, the porridge will keep in the fridge for a few days. You can take out a portion and reheat it with you favourite soya, rice, nut or oat milk when you’re ready. Just pop a portion in a microwave-proof bowl, mash it with a fork and stir in some milk, then¬†reheat on High for about 1 ¬Ĺ minutes. Alternatively, you can reheat¬†the porridge¬†in a saucepan, with milk,¬†in the same way.

The following quantity will make about 8 servings: pour 1.1litre water into your slow-cooker and stir in 175g pinhead oatmeal. Add a pinch of salt and mix well. Cover with the lid and switch the cooker on to the Low setting. Leave to cook, undisturbed, overnight (for 8-10 hours), until thick and soft. To serve, stir well and serve with hot, non-dairy milk mixed in. Add sugar or syrup to sweeten if you like, and top with sliced banana, fresh berries, grated apple, dried fruit etc.

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Homemade seed mix and my frozen summer berries. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

For an extra nutritious start to the day, I like to stir a heaped tablespoon of ground seeds into my bowl porridge and top with some summer berry compote.

For the seed mix, grind 3 tbsp. flax seeds with 2 tbsp. sunflower seeds, 1 tbsp. chia seeds and 1 tbsp. sesame seeds РI use a coffee grinder to do this. Stir in 1 to 2 tbsp. ground almonds, pecans or Brazil nuts. Store in the fridge in an airtight container and use to sprinkle over anything you like for some extra nutritious nuttiness!

The berry compote is made from my freezer supply of home-grown raspberries, blackberries and blueberries. I simply put a quantity, still frozen, in a saucepan with the lid on and sit the pan over a very low heat until the berries soften and cook. I add a little vanilla sugar once the berries are cooked. Delicious eaten hot or cold.

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A spoonful of my favourite oatmeal porridge. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

 

 

Curly kale – recipe ideas and serving suggestions

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Green and red curly kale. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

The hardiest of all the Brassica family, and probably the closest to wild cabbage, kale (or kail) is one of the most traditional of Scottish vegetables. The robust leaves withstand harsh frosts and snow, and are said to taste all the better for it. In the past, kale was dismissed as animal fodder, but today it is one of the most trendy vegetables on the menu.

Kale is one of my favourite greens. I love the strong flavour, it is bursting with vitality in every bite, and it is one of the few vegetables tasty enough to stand its own on a plate with other bold flavours.

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Keeping kale fresh in a bowl of water. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

As with all leafy vegetables, cook as soon as possible after purchase. Choose firm stalks with fresh, dark or bright green leaves. If you do want to keep them for a couple of days, arrange the stems¬†in a bowl or large jug of water¬†as you would a bunch of flowers,¬†then¬†put in the fridge. I find kale is¬†one of a few¬†vegetables that doesn’t freeze very well – it loses texture and flavour, and becomes a bit slimy when cooked.

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Kale leaves. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

Simple to prepare, just rinse kale well in cold, running water to flush out any trapped earth caught in the tight, curling leaves, and then shake off the excess water. Pull off the lower, frilly leaves and keep to one side Рthese softer leaves are perfect for eating raw in winter salads. Slice out the central stem, and then shred the leaves into the desired size.

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Preparing curly kale. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

If you are steaming kale, pack the wet leaves into a steamer and cook for 10-15 minutes until tender. Alternatively, pack the wet leaves into a saucepan, turn on the heat and when the contents begin to steam, put the lid on, reduce the heat to medium¬†and cook with the lid on, turning occasionally, for about 10 minutes – don’t have the heat too high otherwise the leaves will dry and burn. Drain well and chop finely.

For baking and deep-frying, rinse the leaves then make sure you dry them as much as possible in order to cook them to a crisp. Blotting them between layers of absorbent kitchen paper is a good way. If the leaves are too damp, you will end up steaming them in the oven rather than drying them out. In hot oil, the contents will spit and hiss if water still clings to the leaves.

Recipe ideas and serving suggestions

  • Shredded kale makes fantastic “crispy seaweed”: deep-fry in hot vegetable¬†oil for a few seconds, then drain well¬†and toss in a little salt and white sugar. Season with Szechuan pepper or Chinese 5 spice.
  • Toss raw, small, tender kale leaves with¬†finely shredded raw leek and grated apple¬†in a lemon vinaigrette and season with freshly ground black pepper. Serve as a crunchy, bold winter salad sprinkled with toasted walnuts.
  • Steamed kale is delicious, finely chopped, tossed in butter or good quality olive oil¬†and seasoned with black pepper and ground nutmeg. An ideal¬†accompaniment to a bold, red wine gravy based game, meat or bean stew.
  • Add finely chopped, steamed kale to a garlic mash. See My favourite mash (gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan
  • Mix finely chopped, steamed kale with cooked brown rice or pearl barley, toasted pine nuts and grated Parmesan (or Vegan cheese) and use as a filling for baked Portobello mushrooms.
  • Tray-baked kale leaves¬†make a healthy sprinkle for salads, soups, rice and pasta dishes. Here’s what to do: preheat the oven to 150¬įC (130¬įC fan oven, gas mark 2). Line 2 large baking trays with baking parchment. Prepare 200g kale leaves as above, then rinse and dry thoroughly. Roughly chop the leaves and place in a large bowl. Toss in no more than 2 tbsp. sunflower oil and arrange over the trays – too much oil will make the leaves go soggy. Mix 1 teasp smoked salt,¬†¬Ĺ teasp ground black pepper and 1 teasp ground cumin together and sprinkle over the oily kale.

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Baking kale. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Bake for 25-30 minutes until crisp. Drain well, leave to cool, then pack into air-tight containers or jars to store. The baked kale will keep and stay crisp in this way for up to 2 weeks.

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Cumin-spiced, tray-baked kale. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Burns Night mini chocolate haggis (gluten-free; dairy-free & vegan alternatives)

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Mini haggis sweeties. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

A¬†short post this week, but I wanted¬†to publish a recipe to¬†celebrate Scotland’s national poet, Robert Burns, whose anniversary falls on January 25th each year. These cute,¬† haggis-shaped sweet treats are a version of my Chocolate Haggis for a Burns Night supper (gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan)¬†recipe from last year. You can mix and match ingredients¬†according to¬†the¬†bits and pieces¬†you have to hand. If you don’t like marzipan,¬†¬†use ivory or cream¬†coloured fondant icing instead.

Makes: 16

Ingredients

  • 50g unsalted butter or coconut oil
  • 50g heather honey or golden syrup
  • 75g¬†free-from dark chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 75g¬†free-from oatcakes, finely crushed
  • 40g toasted fine oatmeal
  • 50g currants
  • 50g toasted flaked almonds, crushed
  • Icing sugar to dust
  • 400g natural marzipan
  1. Put the butter (coconut oil) and honey (golden syrup) in a saucepan with the chocolate, and heat very gently, stirring, until melted.
  2. Remove from the heat and stir in the crushed oatcakes, oatmeal, currants and almonds. Mix well until thoroughly combined. Leave to cool, then chill for about 30 minutes until firm enough to form into portions.
  3. Divide the mixture into 16 and form each into an oval-shaped sausage. Chill for 30 minutes until firm.
  4. Divide the marzipan into 16 and flatten each into a round Рuse a little icing sugar if the marzipan is sticky. Wrap a disc of marzipan around each chocolate oat cluster; press the edges to seal and then twist the ends to make a haggis shape.

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    Mini chocolate haggis preparation. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

    Store¬†the mini haggis at a cool room temperature until ready to eat. The marzipan will become sticky if refrigerated. Best enjoyed with coffee¬†and a wee dram.¬† Until next week, I raise a glass to you all and say “Sl√†inte!” – to your good health ūüôā

    Plate_of_mini_chocolate_haggis_and_a_wee_dram_of_whisky
    Mini haggis and a wee dram. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Rumbledethumps (gluten-free; dairy-free & vegan alternatives)

 

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Freshly baked Rumbledethumps. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

Great name for a recipe eh? What’s more, I haven’t made it up. This is a Scottish classic, and I’ve chosen to post it now for 2 reasons. It’s been very cold here this week and this is fabulous comfort food, and also with the festive season nearly upon us,¬†it is¬†an excellent¬†recipe¬†for using¬†up leftovers. It uses 2 of my favourite vegetables, potatoes and kale (or cabbage).

I love kale. So much flavour and texture, I think it out-strips cabbage and other greens in every way. Up until a couple of years ago, Cavelo Nero, Italian black kale, was my favourite variety, but then along came mini kale and my mind was changed. Very quick to cook, simple to prepare, with a milder, slightly sweet and nutty flavour, it looks very pretty too. The small leaves are  also excellent raw in winter salads.

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Mini kale. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

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Heads of mini kale, up close. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

So on with the recipe. Traditionally, this is a¬†very simple combination of leftover cooked potatoes and cabbage fried¬†with onion and then grilled with cheese on top. What’s not to like? The name, by the way, is believed to come from the combination of the “thumping”¬†sound¬†associated with¬†mashing potato and the mixing together of the ingredients (a “rumble”). Here’s my version.

Serves: 3 to 4 as a side dish

Ingredients

  • 150g mini kale, kale, cabbage or other greens¬†(if you have leftovers, you’re halfway there with the recipe already)
  • 500g cooked potatoes (I had some boiled small potatoes with skins on to use up)
  • 25g butter or dairy-free margarine
  • 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 leek, trimmed and shredded (or use thinly¬†sliced onion if you prefer)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 50g grated Scottish Cheddar or dairy-free/vegan grated cheese
  1. If you are starting from scratch, prepare the greens and cook them in lightly salted water for 3-5 minutes until just tender. Drain well.
  2. Put the potatoes in a bowl and mash them to crush slightly.
  3. In a large frying pan, melt the butter with the oil and gently fry the leek for 3-4 minutes until softened (if you’re using onion, cook it gently for longer, until tender).
  4. Stir in the potatoes and greens, and stir fry the vegetables gently together for 5-6 minutes until thoroughly heated. Season well and transfer to a heatproof dish.

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    Basic preparation of Rumbledethumps. Image: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Preheat the grill to medium/hot. Sprinkle the vegetables with grated cheese and grill for about 5 minutes until golden and bubbling. Serve immediately.

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Comfort with every spoonful. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

 

 

Sesame shortbreads (gluten-free; dairy-free; vegan)

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Sesame shortbreads. Image: Kathryn Hawkins

I’ve had a busy few days with my work, and subsequently only had time for¬†one quick baking session¬†this week. I¬†turned to¬†an old favourite of mine, shortbread. Easy to make and lovely to eat,¬†and open to so many variations. This time,¬†I had a break with tradition and¬†made a super rich seeded version and replaced some of the fat with tahini.

I often replace¬†a portion of¬†the flour in¬†cakes and bakes¬†with ground almonds, and, if I don’t have enough ready-ground, I¬†blitz up my own in a coffee grinder. If you use the non-blanched almonds, you’ll find the ground meal¬†gives a¬†more earthy¬†to your bakes.

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Sesame seed paste and home-made ground almonds. Images: Kathryn Hawkins

These tasty¬†shortbreads have a soft,¬†crumbly texture, and a rich, nutty flavour; they are delicious with a cup of coffee and keep well for a few days in an airtight tin. I find them impossible to resist. I’m away to¬†eat the last one after I finish typing this!

Makes: 18

Ingredients

  • 150g gluten-free plain flour (such as Dove’s Farm)
  • 65g icing sugar
  • 75g ground almonds
  • 25g toasted sesame seeds
  • 85g tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • 50g very soft¬†dairy-free margarine (or butter if you eat it)
  • 1 tbsp. each of chia seeds, toasted sesame seeds and Demerara sugar, mixed,¬†for the topping
  1. Sieve the flour and icing sugar into a bowl and stir in the ground almonds and toasted sesame seeds.
  2. Mix the tahini and margarine together until well blended, then stir into the dry ingredients until well mixed.
  3. Bring the ingredients together using your hands, then turn out on to a lightly floured work surface and knead gently to form a smooth dough. Divide into 18 portions and form each into a ball.
  4. Arrange on the baking tray, press down lightly to make chunky rounds and sprinkle lightly with the sugary seed mix. Chill for 30 minutes.

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    Preparing sesame shortbreads. Image: Kathryn Hawkins
  5. Preheat the oven to 180¬įC (160¬įC fan oven), gas 4. Line a large baking tray with baking parchment. Bake the shortbreads for about 25 minutes until lightly brown and crisp. Leave to cool on the tray.

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    Ready for eating, sesame shortbreads. Image: Kathryn Hawkins